Watch for baby deer . . . it’s best to leave them alone.

Look closely at this photo — see the tiny fawn in the center of the photo?

fawn may 8 2019 cropped

This photo was taken on Wednesday, May 8, around 11:00 AM along Newman’s Neck Road about 1/4 mile before the entrance to our neighborhood.  The fawn was observed the day before in the same spot, grazing and later lying in this spot.  Late Wednesday afternoon, a few hours after this photo was made, the fawn was gone and has not been seen since.

White-tailed deer fawns are born April through July, with the majority of fawns born in June. Most does will have one fawn the first year they give birth, then, twins or triplets are typically seen thereafter. Until they are strong enough to keep up with their mothers, deer fawns are left alone while their mothers go off to feed.

This fawn likely was left there by his/her mother while the mother doe went off to feed or find water.

We are posting this information here to remind everyone to please do not touch any fawn you may find in the neighborhood or anywhere else.

Until they are strong enough to keep up with their mothers, deer fawns are left alone while their mothers go off to feed. Mother deer will stay away from the fawns to avoid leading predators to their young. Does return at dawn and dusk to feed and/or move their young.

Fawns are typically left in an area with tall grass or bushes, but sometimes they are left in more open areas, including backyards. Older deer fawn may wander short distances.

Well-meaning humans often assume that because a fawn is alone it must be an orphan, leading to numerous fawn “kidnappings” each year.

A fawn has the BEST chance of survival when cared for by its mother. Typically, the best option is to leave the fawn alone!  Also, remember to keep your dog or children away from any fawn you may find — or any other baby animal for that matter.

Here is a website with more information about what to do if you encounter a fawn.  Notice that if the fawn is injured, you should contact a wildlife rescue agency.  In our county, call the Northumberland County Sheriff — 804-580-5221 — and ask for animal control.

There are no licensed wildlife rescue agencies in our county; the nearest are in Gloucester, about 45 to 60 minutes away.

Stephanie Booker Gloucester (804) 815-2042 Fawns, Small Mammals
Carolyn Vavala Saluda (804) 694-6722 Fawns, High Risk Rabies, Opossum

You also can contact Wild Bunch Wildlife Rehablitation in Warsaw — 804-313-2240.  They deal mainly with birds and small animals; sometimes they are able to help with injured fawns.